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What should a pregnant mother do after being in a car accident?

No matter how you feel and no matter how minor the car accident seems, if you are involved in a collision and you are pregnant, you should see a doctor immediately. This is true no matter how deep into the pregnancy you happen to be. For that matter, California mothers-to-be should visit their doctor for a check up if they have been involved in any kind of accident, even if it’s not related to an automobile.

The biggest danger of being in a car accident while pregnant involves the placenta separating from the uterus. In medical terminology, this is referred to as placental abruption. This condition, which is sometimes caused by car accidents, can result in a miscarriage, a premature delivery or a hemorrhage. Strangely, though, it is possible for women who have an abruption to not notice symptoms until it is dangerously late.

Pregnant women who report to the emergency room following a car accident will be checked out to ensure that their condition is stable. Next, they will receive an ultrasound and an obstetric exam to see how the placenta and fetus are doing. Sometimes, doctors will keep a pregnant woman under observation to be certain that she and the baby are going to be okay.

Once discharged from the hospital, pregnant women will want to watch out for vaginal bleeding, contractions, leaking fluid or pain in the abdomen. Another sign that something could be wrong is reduced movement by the baby.

Maryland mothers-to-be who suspect that their baby was hurt in a car accident before he or she was born may want to investigate the accident and other details of their injuries more closely. Indeed, in some situations, accident scene evidence can be used to support a mother’s legal claims for damages relating to the incident.

Source: babycenter.com, “What should I do if I’m in a car accident while I’m pregnant?” Wendy Wilcox, accessed Mar. 18, 2015

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